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John GaileyAge: 72 years18141887

Name
John Gailey
Given names
John
Surname
Gailey
BirthMormon Pioneer Overland Travel
Publication: http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneerdetails/1,15791,4018-1-48076,00.html
Text:
Gailey, John Birth Date: 19 Nov. 1814 Death Date: 31 Mar. 1887 Gender: Male Age: 33 Company: Brigham Young Company (1848)
SourceRootsWeb
SourceUtah Cemetery Inventory
Citation details: Utah Cemetery Inventory
Text:
Utah Cemetery Inventory about John Gailey Name: John Gailey Birth Date: 19 Nov 1813 Birth Place: England Death Date: 30 Mar 1887 Burial Date: 31 March 1887 Cemetery: Kaysville City Cemetery Source: Sexton Records / Grant Grave Location: 17-1-A-8 Relatives: Spouse Mary Mills
Quality of data: primary evidence
SourceAutobiography of John Gailey
Text:
John Gailey November 19, 1813 – March 31, 1887 The following was mostly taken from John Gailey's own diary. I, John Gailey, the son of William and Eleanor Harris Gailey, was born November 19, 1814, in Herefordshire, Suffolk, England. When I was young I was deeply concerned about Eternity and the coming of the SON OF GOD, but I told no one about it for some time. Later on some preachers visited us calling themselves Primitive Methodists, holding forth Salvation through Christ by Faith alone. I attended their preaching for some time, at last joined their Church as a member. Some soon separated themselves from them and formed themselves into another sect calling themselves UNITED BRETHREN, soon I left the first and joined the latter, as a local preacher. I was to preach on Sundays, which I continued to do one year and ten months. Thomas Kington, who was then our leader, desired me to give myself wholly to the ministry, which I did. This was in January 1836. I continued to preach amongst them until 1840, when it pleased God to send Elder Wilford Woodruff to Castle Trower ‎[sic; this is most likely in reference to Castle Frome (map)‎, found in Herefordshire] with the fullness of the Gospel as revealed to Joseph Smith; John Benbow a wealthy land owner living in Herefordshire, gave elder Woodford the privilege of preaching in his home which contained a large hall. The entire congregation of United Brethren, about 600 members was converted and baptized. ‎(for further informationon this event, see: historical vignette of Elder Woodruff's account of his mission in England)‎. It was was on March 24th 1840 that I was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and on the same evening after my confirmation and ordination I accompanied Elder Woodruff to his appointment to preach. From this time on I continued to preach and his appointment to preach and baptize. On May 18th which was five months later, I was ordained a Priest and thus with authority I began to preach the Gospel and on June 21st, I baptized three for the remission of their sins. I continued to fill the office of a Priest preaching and baptizing until September 21st when I was ordained an Elder at the conference at Stanley Hill ‎[map]‎. After this I began to visit the churches and strengthen them in the faith. On September 27th I preached at Cradley ‎[map]‎ and baptized one. The same day at Froom ‎[sic, this is most likely Frome (map)‎] I baptized Ann Bull, also confirmed her a member of the church in the New and Everlasting Covenant. The next day I returned home. On October 11th, I visited the Church at Duns Clofs ‎[sic]‎ and Browerutt ‎[sic]‎ and baptized Richard Johnson, William Johnson, Mary Johnson, Elinor Smith, Hannah Spilsbury, George Spilsbury, Henry Carbert. I laid my hands on them and prayed that they might received the Holy Ghost. After this I visited Bro. Barnes in the Forest of Dean ‎[parish map; current map]‎ in the County of Gloucester. This was the first mission I went on with the fullness of the Gospel. I arrived there on October 19th where I found Bro. James Barnes in the house of Elizah Clifford, who received me gladly. I preached the same night at James Phelps. Then next morning he was baptized. I then baptized George Voyce, Prudence Phelps, Hannah Voyce, Mary Phelps and Jane Phelps. The next Thursday we laid our hands on them. Thus we continued preaching and teaching the things of the Kingdom of God. After a while I returned to see my friends in Herefordshire, where I had seen them and rejoiced with them in the Lord. I went with Bro. Phillips, a Priest who had agreed to go with me to preach the Gospel of Christ; so on the morrow we set out on our mission. We visited several of the Churches and preached to them on our way to the forest. On November 15th I preached three times and baptized Comfort Broughter andMaria Davies. The next day I baptized John Rich and confirmed three and laid hands on them that they might received the Holy Ghost. Then we resumed our journey. The next day we arrived at the forest. There we preached the Gospel of Jesus Christ at Hazel Hill ‎[map]‎ to a small branch of the Church; but behold they were a stiff necked people. We had to use great plainness and to exercise much patience continually. I baptized William Tingle and confirmed him, after this I had some opposition from the Wesleyans. I later visited the conference at Stanley Hill, Herefordshire and then I went to assist Elder Smith in a part of Worcestershire. We organized the church at Hurde Common; we ordained two Priests and one teacher. This was about April 1841. After I had preached the Gospel in any villages around about, I returned and visited some of the churches in different parts of Worcestershire and Herefordshire, then returned to the forest and spoke the word of God to as many as would come to hear. About July 4th, I was assisted by Martin Littlewood, ‎(who was an Elder)‎ to preach to the people in the open air, one at ‎(Little Deans Hill [sic, correct spelling is Littledean Hill [map]‎) and at Little Dean ‎[sic, correct spelling isLittledean (map)‎]. in some the word had place and came forward and were obedient to the truth. I baptized three of them shortly afterwards which were Samuel Lewis and wife and James Tingle. We also confirmed them by the laying on of hands and prayer in the name of Jesus Christ. The next Monday Bro. Mofo and I went to a tea meeting at Greenway Hill. A large number of people were present. Many of them Elders so it was considered a good time to speak to them the word of God to testify to them the truth of the work which the Lord was doing in their midst. After this had been done Elder William Key was ordained a High Priest. The next night we held a fellowship meeting in which many of the Elders and Priests were present. The meeting was opened by singing: Prayer was offered by Bro. Needham. Elder Theodore Curtis gave some very needful and interesting instructions also made some prophesies which I cannot just remember. The spirit of God rested upon us mightily, many spoke in tongues and others prophesiedwhile others bore testimonies that they knew the truth of God's word. The next morning many came and were blessed under the hands of the Elders before they parted. The same day we raised up our voices to the people of Rofs ‎[sic, could be Ross]‎ to repent of their sins, but very few were willing to listen to theword. As we were leaving the village one of them hit me on the shoulder with an egg, and many followed us to the end of town, some crying one thing while others cried something else On July 28th, I preached in Deerhurst ‎[map]‎ to a small branch of the Church and lodged at the home of Thomas Smith. On July 29, 1841, I named and blessed George Margrett, son of William and Susannah Margrett, then I went to Redmarley whereI found Bro. George Brimby sick of a fever; Elder Thomas Oakey and I laid our hands on him and prayed that God would have mercy upon him and heal him. On August 1st, after the congregation had voted unanimously I ordained William Tingle to office of Priest. The next Tuesday I went to Gloucester to see a number of the Saints who were going to leave England for America. ‎(For behold it was ourfaith that God had chosen that land for his people to gather together on, in the last days)‎, therefore, the Saints are going to Babylon as fast as their circumstances ill permit. I remained with them and assisted them with their luggage into awarehouse where we spent the night and held a council to arrange matters for the journey, in order that all would be comfortable for them. ‎[The]‎ next day things were conveyed to the Basin and put in a boat. I accompanied them down the canal about 14 miles where the ship was which they were to sail. We slept on board that night, the next two days I assisted them in making preparations for their journey. On Saturday morning I sailed about two miles with them, then gave them the parting hand and returned back to the Forest. On August 8th I administered the Sacrament to the Saints at Little Deans Woodside, and organized that branch of the church, also appointed William Tingle priest to have care over them, also to assist Elizah ‎[editor's note: spelled Rlizah in thetext]‎ Clifford at Edge Hills ‎[map]‎. The next Monday I attended a council meeting at Remarly; the Saints met there for singing and prayer. Some told of things the Lord had made known to them in way of dreams, other had the spirit of prophecy rest upon them, thus our faith and testimonies did increase. After this meeting I returned to the Forest. Here I baptized James Tingle and confirmed him. I also baptized Samuel Astins and James Mountjou. From here I went to Herefordshire to a Tea Party, at Colwall ‎[map]‎. About Oct. 6, 1841 again we witnessed the power of God in testimonies. One man a Bro. Williams said that before a year had passed Malvery Hill should tremble. On Oct. 11th1841, Bro. Key and I went to a tea party at Frogamarch and after many of the Elders had spoken the word of the Lord to the people Satan entered into a young woman; she cried out, and Bro. Key rebuked him ‎[and]‎ in the name of the Lord commanded him to come out of her and enter no more in her, and so it was. After this I addressed them in the name of the Lord exhorting them to be faithful and prepare for the coming of the Lord which is near at hand. After his I visited a number of the churches thereabout. I came to the U.S.A. sometime about 1842 to1844. My wife, a wonderful woman, came with me. We went to Nauvoo and remained there until driven out by the mob. Here in Nauvoo we shared with others in the persecutions and mob violence, and did what we could to help build up God's Kingdom. It was here that my wife Ann Greaves Gailey and I received our Patriarchal Blessings under the hands of John Smith. We received our endowments in the Nauvoo Temple February 7, 1846, and were sealed by Heber C. Kimball. In 1846 we were forced along with other to leaved Nauvoo to face the hazards of the blistering plains, and came west. I aided other emigrants on this great trek and came to this our blooming and fragrant desert. ‎(NOTE: the balance of this specific history is biographical, penned by others)‎ Somewhere in Pottowotamie County, Iowa, twin babies were born to John and his wife, but both of the babies died. From here they proceeded to Salt Lake City, arriving in the fall of 1848. They made their home on the south west corner of 7th Southand Main Streets. Two daughters were born to them here, Sarah Jane and Elizabeth, and when the latter was three weeks old the mother died. This was in 1851. Sometime later John married a widow, Mary Mills Hudson, who had come from England withher three children, George, Rosa and Thomas Hudson. She made a wonderful mother to all. The family moved to Kaysville in 1854, where he spent the rest of his life as a farmer. It seems when John Gailey first came to Kaysville ‎[map]‎ he made his home with Bro. John S. Smith until he could locate a place of his own and in a short time located on the place now known in the year 1943 as the William E. Gailey home. On this place he first lived in a dug out made first by the Indians. In 1857, he commenced building an adobe house. It is known as the first adobe house in Kaysville. Instead of using nails, as now, he used wooden pegs, which served very well, for aroof he used dirt. This house served really well until 1877 when he finished or added more rooms on, brick and adobe. The brick being hauled from Bountiful. To finish his home he had the blacksmith Mr. Alfred Allred ‎[sic, most likely Alfred Alder]‎ make him some nails, the first nails to ever be made in Kaysville, which cost $5.00 per pound. Some of these nails are now owned and kept by his children and grand children which were taken from the home in later years when the old place as undergoing remodeling. Also there were found two children's shoes which were still in good shape. The soles had bee put on with tiny wooden tacks, which had all been made by hand. These too are being kept with reverence. John Gailey was a great man for council and leadership. He used his head to make improvements of things of which they were the first of such to be used; such as a fly trap, barrels, washing machine, etc. And it was at this time when he aided materially in building a toll bridge near his home to aid people to get onto the main highway, across a deep hollow, as it was too steep a climb to get on to the road otherwise, and was many times very swampy. He made the bridge out of logs, putting the poles upright under close enough together so that when the water was high the brush and leaves, etc. would gather and in due time filled up the great hollow place at this crossing. But while this was taking place, people had to pay a small fee of ten cents to cross over the bridge. Many did not want to pay toll so would try to go below the bridge. Of course, they would get stuck with their load, and then would pay him to pull them out. this would cost them more. Thus the Toll Bridge was paid for. John Gailey had two oxen he kept on the place just for such. He had many a smile about those who weren't going to pay toll. He bought and planted some of the first alfalfa seed in the state of Utah which Bishop Christopher Layton brought from California. He paid 30 bushels of wheat for 30 pounds of alfalfa seed. He also planted the first Hollyhocks of which he had many beautiful colors. These he had for his colony of bees. He had one of the best kept homes in Kaysville, with many fruit trees, grasses lawns, roses and all kinds of flowers, bees in the orchard. He was a man that had great ability for leadership among those with whom he associated with, throughout allhis known history. He was given positions of leadership where council was needed. He was stray Pond Keeper for many years and when people couldn't pay with money; he would take meat, flour and anything they wished to give on the bill. He was a member of the first County School Board. He held the office of Judge for many years, which position he held in a very dignified manner. He was very firm, steady, stern and very positive. Seldom did he loose his tongue in vague talk. He had very pleasant manners. He performed the majority of the civil marriages in this section of the country, and gave everyone good council and advice before he would dismiss them. He was a record keeping man; kept books on all his private affairs, business as well as churchaffairs. had a wonderful way of doing things and everyone knew just where he stood with them. He was a good penman and to this day ‎(1943)‎ his writing is just as readable as it was in 1840. His build was one of rugged features, rather highcheek bones, blue eyes, a heavy mustache and beard. It seems he had an even temper, yet when he spoke it must have been law to those about him, and yet he gained the esteem and respect of all. For little folks he had great love, and enjoyed their friendship and jovial association, and enjoyed joining with them in games, songs and stories. Many stories could be told of what he did. Some of which are: One cold winter when the snow was very deep, a Band of Indians camped on his ground and he had to feed them for several months, as the snow was too deep for hunting. That winter he hadto kill most of his livestock. The hides were always made good use of. The children tied their feet up in pieces of cow hide as they had no shoes until they were nearly grown. He had four wives to which he was very devoted; the first being Ann Greaves to whom was born four children, the first two being twins died in Nauvoo, and then Sarah Jane and Elizabeth. The second was Mary Mills Hudson, to whom was born John Gailey. She was a widow; who had come from England with three children, George, Rosa, and Thomas Hudson; the third was Elizabath ‎[sic]‎ Treganna Henwood and their children were Edwin, Heber, David, Willard and Ernest. The fourth wife was Ann Noble. No children were borne to him by her. For past time and during his leisure in declining years, while still active as Judge, he spent considerable time at the old Blacksmith shop owned by Alfred Alder. The shop stood near the home of J. J. Bowman. The two were very good friends and had many interesting talks in common together. John Gailey died March 31st 1887 at the age of 73 years. John Gailey: personal recollections of his grand-children Grandfather Gailey died while we were still small, buy many of us have a vivid recollection of him and loved to be with him. He always seemed to be so very large and kindly. We well remember how he used to put us on his shoulder and carry us outto the apple trees so that we could reach and pick the big apples from the trees in his orchard on the old farm in Kaysville. Also used to sit on the back porch and watch him take the honey from the hives and later he would give us pieces of honey in the comb to eat. Also remember sitting on his knee in the evenings and eating popcorn, apples and molasses candy whiles the boys, Uncle Heber, Will, Ernest, John, Dave and the others would sing songs and play checkers. Grandfather would join in all of it. Sometimes he would play Old Maid or Smut, and always got a big laugh when he would win and have a chance to smut our faces and to ride with him in his closed carriage lined with red and drawn by a pair of tan colored mules was a real treat. Now we, the descendents of this wonderful leader and Father; feel thankful to him for the heritage he has left us. May we live up to the standards left us by him. through the sufferings, the trials and tribulations he went through; May we never forget,...The spirit he enjoyed -- may we inherit. John Gailey Source: The following history, entitled, "John Gailey", was found in privately published history of Henry Herriman Hintze distributed in July 2005 at a Henry Hintze family reunion held in Copperton, Utah, which history was extracted from histories writtenby Drucilla Sears Howard and Heber J. Sears. John Gailey, son of William and Eleanor Gailey, was born November 19, 1814 in Herefordshire, England. As a young man he was very much concerned about eternity and the coming of the Son of God, but told no one about it for some time. Later, when some preachers came calling themselves Primitive Methodists ‎[Wikipedia entry]‎ and holding forth salvation through Christ by faith alone, he finally joined them and became a member of their church. A short time later some of them separated from the rest of the group and formed another sect, calling themselves United Brethren. John joined with this splinter group as a local preacher. He preached on Sundays for more than a year when the leader, Thomas Kington, asked him to devote all his time to the ministry, which he did. This was in 1836. In the year 1840, Elder Wilford Woodruff visited this section of England and preached to the United Brethren the fullness of the Gospel as revealed in these latter days, and baptized all of them ‎(about 600)‎. On the 24th of March 1840, John Gailey was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and was later ordained a priest. On the same evening, after his baptism, he accompanied Elder Woodruff to his appointment to preach. From this time on he continued to preach the Gospel and to baptize. In his diary he tells of twenty-six people who were converted and baptized by him. He also writes of many wonderful blessing and manifestations of Divine Power which he witnessed. However, his writing ends before he left England and what follows has been put together by his descendants. It is not known just when he left England, but it was probably sometime in the early 1840's. At any rate, he was with the saints when they were driven from Nauvoo, Illinois, and came with his wife, Ann Greaves, to Salt Lake valley, arriving here about the year 1848. In May 1849, their first child, Sarah Jane Gailey, was born. Two years later another daughter, Elizabeth, was born. When this younger child was three weeks old, the mother died. Some time later, John married a widow, Mary Mills Hudson, who had come from England with her three children, George, Rosa, and Thomas Hudson. The family resided in Salt Lake City until about the year 1854, when they moved to Kaysville, Davis County, Utah where John spent the remainder of his life on a farm. He endured all of the hardships incident to pioneer life and at one time fed a large number of Indians, who pitched their tents on his farm and remained there all winter. Food was so scare that without his help, the Indians could not have survivedthe winter. He was a thoroughly trustworthy and up-right man, who was known for his kindness and gentleness. His children and grandchildren ‎(who were fortunate enough to remember him)‎ loved to be with him and to partake of his kindly spirit. His faith in the gospel never wavered and he remained true and faithful to all of its teachings. He died March 31, 1887, at the age of 73 years.
SourceParish Register Marden, Much Cowarne, Herefordshire
Note: rec'd by corres. in possession of T.H. Clark,
Source1850 Census
Publication: Wayne Co., North Carolina
Citation details: 1850 Census Salt Lake City, Utah
Text:
John Gailey 35 Laborer 150 England Ann 34 England Sarah 2 yrs "Des"
SourceMormon Pioneer Overland Travel
Publication: http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneerdetails/1,15791,4018-1-48076,00.html
Text:
Gailey, John Birth Date: 19 Nov. 1814 Death Date: 31 Mar. 1887 Gender: Male Age: 33 Company: Brigham Young Company (1848)
Christening January 9, 1814 (Age )
Note: changed christening date from Chris (ancestry.com)
Birth November 19, 1814 51 43
Publication: http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneerdetails/1,15791,4018-1-48076,00.html
Text:
Gailey, John Birth Date: 19 Nov. 1814 Death Date: 31 Mar. 1887 Gender: Male Age: 33 Company: Brigham Young Company (1848)
Note: Both his diary and the Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel have his birth year as 1814 (the cemetery records has 1813).
Birth of a sisterHannah Gailey
about 1815 (Age 43 days)
Birth of a brotherGeorge Ward Gailey
March 14, 1815 (Age 3 months)
Birth of a sisterJane Gailey
February 1, 1818 (Age 3 years)
Christening of a sisterJane Gailey
December 17, 1818 (Age 4 years)
Death of a brotherWilliam Gailey
December 21, 1823 (Age 9 years)

Death of a brotherGeorge Ward Gailey
March 18, 1828 (Age 13 years)

Death of a fatherWilliam Lewis Gailey
August 8, 1837 (Age 22 years)
LDS baptism March 24, 1840 (Age 25 years)

MarriageAnn GreavesView this family
June 17, 1843 (Age 28 years)
Death of a motherEleanor Harris
September 1845 (Age 30 years)
LDS endowment February 7, 1846 (Age 31 years)

Birth of a daughter
#1
Sarah Jane Gailey
May 22, 1849 (Age 34 years)
Birth of a daughter
#2
Elizabeth Ann Gailey
July 22, 1851 (Age 36 years)
Death of a wifeAnn Greaves
August 13, 1851 (Age 36 years)
MarriageMary MillsView this family
April 3, 1853 (Age 38 years)
Birth of a son
#3
John William Gailey
September 4, 1853 (Age 38 years)
LDS spouse sealingMary MillsView this family
April 3, 1854 (Age 39 years)

Death of a sisterHannah Gailey
April 24, 1858 (Age 43 years)
Citation details: Hannah Gailey Descendants
Publication: taken from the records of Mrs. Glen Loveless, Payson, Utah pages 23-28. It is biased against Hannah and not totally accurate.
Citation details: Record of the Early Settlement of Payson City, Utah Territory
Text:
see Hannah Gailey Descendants source
Burial of a sisterHannah Gailey
April 25, 1858 (Age 43 years)
Note: She was buried inside the dugout she had been living in and is not buried in the Payson City Cemetery. Her house was pulled down around her and her son.
Death of a sisterJane Gailey
August 16, 1858 (Age 43 years)

MarriageElizabeth Tregenna HenwoodView this family
August 25, 1858 (Age 43 years)
LDS spouse sealingElizabeth Tregenna HenwoodView this family
August 25, 1858 (Age 43 years)

Birth of a son
#4
Edwin Gailey
March 21, 1860 (Age 45 years)
Baptism of a daughterElizabeth Ann Gailey
November 1860 (Age 45 years)

Death of a sisterElizabeth Gailey
1861 (Age 46 years)

Birth of a son
#5
David Gailey
February 26, 1862 (Age 47 years)
Birth of a son
#6
Heber Charles Gailey
December 19, 1863 (Age 49 years)
Birth of a son
#7
Willard Gailey
May 15, 1867 (Age 52 years)
Marriage of a childIsaac SearsSarah Jane GaileyView this family
September 26, 1867 (Age 52 years)
Marriage of a childHyrum Thomas RobinsElizabeth Ann GaileyView this family
February 2, 1869 (Age 54 years)
Death of a sisterCharlotte Gailey
April 18, 1869 (Age 54 years)
Burial of a sisterCharlotte Gailey
April 1869 (Age 54 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#1
Mary Ann Sears
August 20, 1869 (Age 54 years)
Birth of a son
#8
Earnest Gailey
September 15, 1869 (Age 54 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#2
Mary Eunice Robins
March 30, 1870 (Age 55 years)
Birth of a grandson
#3
Isaac John Sears
April 3, 1871 (Age 56 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#4
Nettie Ann Robins
June 12, 1872 (Age 57 years)
Death of a grandsonIsaac John Sears
September 14, 1872 (Age 57 years)

Birth of a grandson
#5
William Gailey Sears
February 17, 1873 (Age 58 years)
Death of a sonEdwin Gailey
February 24, 1873 (Age 58 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#6
Sarah Drucilla Sears
December 20, 1874 (Age 60 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#7
Elizabeth Ellen Robins
June 21, 1875 (Age 60 years)
Death of a wifeElizabeth Tregenna Henwood
January 8, 1876 (Age 61 years)
Burial of a wifeElizabeth Tregenna Henwood
January 1876 (Age 61 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#8
Etta May Sears
December 1, 1876 (Age 62 years)
MarriageAnn NobleView this family
June 27, 1877 (Age 62 years)
LDS spouse sealingAnn NobleView this family
June 27, 1877 (Age 62 years)

Birth of a granddaughter
#9
Jessie Sears
August 28, 1878 (Age 63 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#10
Annie Eliza Robins
October 23, 1878 (Age 63 years)
Marriage of a childJohn William GaileyMary Elizabeth BarnesView this family
November 28, 1878 (Age 64 years)
Death of a granddaughterElizabeth Ellen Robins
August 2, 1879 (Age 64 years)
Death of a granddaughterNettie Ann Robins
August 19, 1879 (Age 64 years)
Birth of a grandson
#11
John Richard Gailey
August 25, 1879 (Age 64 years)
Death of a granddaughterAnnie Eliza Robins
March 4, 1880 (Age 65 years)
Birth of a grandson
#12
Thomas Richard Robins
May 1, 1880 (Age 65 years)
Birth of a grandson
#13
Ira Sears
August 22, 1880 (Age 65 years)
Birth of a grandson
#14
Arthur Franklin Gailey
February 1, 1881 (Age 66 years)
Birth of a grandson
#15
Harold Earnest Sears
August 10, 1882 (Age 67 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#16
Stella Robins
April 26, 1883 (Age 68 years)
Death of a grandsonIra Sears
July 1, 1883 (Age 68 years)

Death of a grandsonHarold Earnest Sears
August 16, 1883 (Age 68 years)

Birth of a grandson
#17
Albert Eugene Sears
March 5, 1884 (Age 69 years)
Birth of a grandson
#18
Milton Henry Sears
April 9, 1886 (Age 71 years)
Marriage of a childJohn William GaileyElizabeth EdmondsView this family
May 25, 1886 (Age 71 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#19
Jennie Robins
November 8, 1886 (Age 71 years)
Birth of a grandson
#20
Gailey
1887 (Age 72 years)
Death of a grandsonGailey
1887 (Age 72 years)

Alt. Death
Alt. Death
March 31, 1887 (on the date of death)
Death March 31, 1887 (Age 72 years)
Burial April 3, 1887 (3 days after death)
LDS child sealing November 15, 1943 (56 years after death)

LDS temple: SLAKE - SALT LAKE

Last change July 13, 201107:48:21

by: Pam
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: May 22, 1797Much Cowarne, Herefordshire, England
10 months
elder sister
elder sister
2 years
elder sister
3 years
elder sister
3 years
elder brother
William Gailey
Birth: August 18, 1805 42 34, Much Cowarne, Herefordshire, England
Death: December 21, 1823
3 years
younger sister
Hannah Gailey
Birth: about 1815 51 43Much Cowarne, Here, Eng
Death: April 24, 1858Payson, Utah, Utah
3 years
elder sister
3 years
himself
4 years
younger sister
Jane Gailey
Birth: February 1, 1818 54 47, Bedlam Green, Herefordshire, England
Death: August 16, 1858
-3 years
younger brother
Mother’s family with John Bayley - View this family
step-father
John Bayley
Birth: about 1770Of Much Cowarne, Herefordshire, England
Burial: May 18, 1796, Much Cowarne, Herefordshire, England
mother
Marriage: February 7, 1793, Much Cowarne, Herefordshire, England
Family with Elizabeth Tregenna Henwood - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: August 25, 1858Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
19 months
son
Edwin Gailey
Birth: March 21, 1860 45 19Kaysville, Davis, UT
Death: February 24, 1873Kaysville, Davis, UT.
23 months
son
22 months
son
3 years
son
2 years
son
Family with Ann Greaves - View this family
himself
wife
Ann Greaves
Birth: October 17, 1816Preston, Bissett, Dyrfordshire, England
Death: August 13, 1851Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Marriage: June 17, 1843Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA
8 years
daughter
-2 years
daughter
Family with Mary Mills - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: April 3, 1853Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
5 months
son
Family with Ann Noble - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: June 27, 1877St. George, Washington, Utah, USA
Edward Willmott + Ann Noble - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
Marriage:
step-son
step-daughter
step-daughter
step-daughter
step-son
step-daughter

Christening
changed christening date from Chris (ancestry.com)
Birth
Both his diary and the Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel have his birth year as 1814 (the cemetery records has 1813).
Note
Jan 1836 Joined the United Brethren as a preacher Departed 7 Mar 1843 from Liverpool, Lancashire, England Departure aboard the ship "Yorkshire" to New Orleans (from Chris on ancestry.com)
Source
rec'd by corres. in possession of T.H. Clark, Oakley, Idaho 83346.
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John Gailey's Grave.JPG
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Media objectKaysville Cemetery
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johngailey2.jpg
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johngailey.jpg
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Media objectFarm Hill Baptismal Pond
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Media objectFarm Hill Baptismal Pond
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Media objectJohn Benbow Farm
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Media objectSt Michael and All Angels (inside)
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Media objectSt Michael and All Angels 2
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Media objectSt Michael and All Angels 3
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Media objectSt Michael and All Angels brochure p1
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Media objectSt Michael and All Angels brochure p2
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Media objectSt Michael and All Angels
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Note: St Michael and All Angels is where John Gailey was christened
Media objectHill Farm Sign
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Media objectWilford Woodruff Plaque
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Media objectMap of Hancock County
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Note: Camp Creek is where John and Ann Gailey settled during their stay in Nauvoo, Illinois with the early LDS Saints.
Media objectJohhn Gailey journal page
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Note: Taken from John Gailey's journal telling of his religious beliefs.
Media objectJohn Gailey Toombstone
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Note: Original grave markers of John Gailey, Elizabeth Henwood, Mary Mills, and Ann Noble
Media objectJohn Gailey portrait
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John Gailey from book.jpg
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Note: picture from "Pioneers and Prominent men of Utah"
Source1850 Census John Gailey
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