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Louis Karras1892

Name
Louis Karras
Given names
Louis
Surname
Karras

Ludwig

Name
Ludwig
Given names
Ludwig
Birth1910 Census
Text:
Louis Karas, sevant in home of O'Conner Family (from Canada) 17 yrs old; birthplace Russia birthplace of both parents (Russia)
Note: There is a William Wonnick servant next door
SourceHardship and Happiness
Publication: Interlake Pioneers, Steep Rock, Man. 1974
Text:
MARTIN Pioneer History of Louis Karras, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Karras who came to the homestead 5 1/2 miles north west of Moosehorn from Neche, North Dakota, U.S.A. in June 1911. I didn't like the idea of my parents going on to a homestead, so I stayed back until November 1912 or four days before my 20th birthday. It was then I decided to visit my parents and see for myself how they were getting along, as they were well up in age. My father was 73 years of age at that time. They had a small log house, two cows, and a garden and that was all, but they had very friendly neighbors. There was a family on every quarter section in our district. They were all trying to help one another, so I decided this should be a nice place to make my home. I made it my home from 1912 until 1947 when I sold my farm to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kort, who I believe are still living on it. Adjoining the homestead we had the following neighbors: the William Pohl family to the south, Dolph Pischkes to the west, Gus Knopp's to the north and my brother Edward to the east. Adjoining the corners were the Andrew Nickel family on the south east corner. George Karras family on the south west corner, Gus Teske family on the north west corner and Louis Hertzog family on the south east corner. So it didn't matter which direction one turned, you would always be close to a neighbor and they were all nice people to know and associate with. By sheer coincidence when I went to visit my parents, I happened to be one of the first passengers on the first passenger train that pulled into Moosehorn. Up to that date the passenger trains only ran as far as Oak Point, then you had to transfer to a freight train that pulled a passenger car. I bought my ticket at Winnipeg to go to Mooshorn but when we got to Oak Point to transfer to the freight car, we were told if we wanted to wait till Monday there would be a passenger train straight to Gypsumville. This happened to be on a Friday and being young, I decided to stay in the Oak Point Hotel over the week end, just to be one of the first passengers on the first passenger train that pulled into Moosehorn. I was very disappointed upon my arrival to Moosehorn for I saw nothing but spruce trees and stumps where ever I looked. There were a C.N.R. station, water tank, and a little store called the "Armstrong Trading Co." It was located on the west side of the railway tracks and was managed by Steve Stephenson. On the east side of the tracks was a log built store called "Moosehorn Supply", managed by Ben Edlen who sold everything from needles, to rye whiskey under the counter for $1.00 for a 26 ounce bottle. Everybody thought he was a great man, and he was. In the spring of 1913 I built an addition to our house and after that my father and I started clearing land and with about the second swing of my axe I struck a rock. My father heard me say words he had never heard me say before, as I was brought up very religiously. He didn't say anything and we just kept working. We cleared and broke about five acres that summer. This land was broken up with a combination of one team of horses and one team of oxen, by my brother Ed and brother-in-law Louis Hertzog. By 1913-1915 most of the homesteaders were getting titles to their land and they were all anxious for capital to invest in more horses, cattle, and farm implements. Not more than 5 percent of the settlers had fire insurance and to obtaina mortgage loan you had to have fire insurance on your buildings, so I took advantage of the opportunity and became the first fire insurance and mortgage loan agent in Moosehor. When I wasn't clearning or breaking land or doing something useful on the homestead, I'd be out taking fire insurance and mortgage loan applications. I was one up on both the late Mr. Roth and Syd Watchorn in this respect. In 1916 my father transferred the title of his homestead in my name, with the understanding that I keep and look after him and my Mother as long as they live, which I did. They are both resting in the St. John Cemetery in the Martin School district. In 1920 I married Miss Elsie Briese from Beausejour. We raised five childre: Joan, now Mrs. Fred Brady of Thunder Bay; Alice, now Mrs. Albert Gall of Vancourver, Beatrice, now Mrs. Douglas Holden of Kamloops, Herbert and Howard both now in Burnaby. In 1920 I was one of the first farmers to own an automobil, a 1917 model Ford. The picture shown here was taken in Foster's yard, about three miles north west of Moosehorn, with Mrs. Foster, her daughter Winifred and son Ray in the back seat, my wife and myself in the front seat. I was also Secretary Tresurer for Martin School district for seventeen years. Following are some of the names of the Trustees and teachers I can recall: Trustees: Mr. Gallwray, Mr. Pohl, Mr. Michie, Mr. Schultz, Mr. Foster, Mr. Ketner, Mr. Nichols, Mr. Kummerfeldt, Mr. Dreger, Mr. Hertzog, Mr. Werner, Mr. Winther, Mr. Itterman and Mr. Newman. Teahcers: Mr. Nichols, Mr. Lechner, Mr. Hope, Mr. Kaplin, Mr. Low, Mr. Korody, Mr. Dyck, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. Milles, Miss RossKelly, Miss Skygford, Miss Freedman, Miss Masnick, Miss Cook (now Mrs. Walter Gall) and Miss Leonard (Now Mrs. Roy Hertzog). In the fall of 1929 I purchased the Wm. pohl homestead adjoining ours to the south, with 80 acres under cultivation. I was selling wheat at the elevator for $1.35 per bushel, oats at 65c and barley at 85c. With prices like that I figured I could pay for the place in a short time, not foreseeing the depression that was to last for the next ten years. By 1930 I was in trouble. I sold wheat at 32c per bushel, oats at 20c and barley about 22c. We sold cream from 90c to 1.50 for a five gallon can, depending on the grade. Eggs wer 8c per dozen, but being in mixed farming area we produced almost everything that could be produced on a farm at that time. Besides grain and and cream we had hogs, turkeys, geese and chickens, so always had plenty to eat and were grateful for it. While hundreds of thousands of people were on relief (social welfare as they call it today) from coast to coast, we farmers were laughing it off as we were not hungry. Despite the fact that we have now lived in Vancouver for over 26 years and despite some of the hardships we sometimes suffered during the homestead years when we had no roads at all and had to wind our way through the bush on the higher levels, even to get to our nearest neighbors, sweet precious memories remain in our hearts. Especially we remember when our children were small and we were all one happy family back home on the farm at Moosehorn. Greetings to all pioneers who are still in the Moosehorn area.
SourceHardship and Happiness
Publication: Interlake Pioneers, Steep Rock, Man. 1974
Text:
The Hertzog Family ‎‎(excerpts)‎‎ Louis Hertzog, Ed Knopp, Wm. Keen and Ed Karras were the first four settlers in the Martin School District, coming from Neche, North Dakota in 1911. . . for every quarter section, there was some type of land descritpion which a prospective settler might look at, but when he filed his claim, very often found that most of the quarter was swamp, lke or unsuitable. In March of 1911 these four neighbors decided to go out and look at the quarters they had picked out. After a rugged trip, and some hiking around, they built a fair sized log shack on Ed Karras farm. They had with them John Karras, whot ook up the quarter ‎‎(later Louis Karrasfarm)‎‎ now the Kort farm. The other two Karras boys, Louis and Adolph, came out the next winter, but it was too rugged for Adolph, who stayed only the winter and went back to North Dakota. Johnny Matheson had a livery stable and drove the settlers out to their claims. Meanwhile the wives an children had still stayed in the States. Louis Hertzog then went back hom and brought his wife ‎‎(John Karras' daughter)‎‎ and two sons, Henry and Adolph, out by train. Louise had $2.00 in his pocket and two childrent o look after, so life was not too easy. He got a job working on the railway construction farther north of Moosehorn ‎‎(Station 13)‎‎ for about three months which gave him a little cash. When he came home he began work on his own cabin.As the three families had all been living together. Dad went back to the States at harvest time, as did the other men and the women had to get along by themselves. Fortunately water was fairly plentiful as they only dug down about 14 feet for awell. When the men returned, John Karras brought a carload of farm stock, cattle, horses, etc. Dad bought a cow and 15 chickens from him . . . The Martin School was built on Ed Karras' farm in the spring of 1913. It was a frame building and Herbie Langstone was the main carpenter. IT was completed in time to open school on December 1, 1913. . . The people visited each other upon many a small pretext, for life was hard work with little emjoyment. At first we held church service at Karras's house and later in the school, so this part of our life was not altogether neglected. . .
Source1910 Census
Citation details: 1910 Census Northa Dakota
Text:
Louis Karas, sevant in home of O'Conner Family (from Canada) 17 yrs old; birthplace Russia birthplace of both parents (Russia) There is a William Wonnick servant next door
Quality of data: primary evidence
Birth November 1892 53

Source: 1910 Census
Text:
Louis Karas, sevant in home of O'Conner Family (from Canada) 17 yrs old; birthplace Russia birthplace of both parents (Russia)
Note: There is a William Wonnick servant next door
Death of a half-brotherGottlieb Karas
July 1920 (Age 27 years)
Death of a fatherJohann Karras
August 2, 1920 (Age 27 years)
Death of a motherMathilde Baum
October 4, 1922 (Age 29 years)

Death of a half-brotherJulius Karras
January 9, 1949 (Age 56 years)
Death of a brotherAdolph Karras
December 8, 1968 (Age 76 years)
Death of a sisterJulianna Karras
July 25, 1969 (Age 76 years)
Death of a brotherEdward Albert Karras
June 15, 1972 (Age 79 years)
Text:
Name: Albert Karras Place Parksville Reg. Number: 1972-09-011027 Digital Image On-Line Date: 1972 6 15 (Yr/Mo/Day) Age: 60 Event: Death Microfilm #: B13319 (GSU # 2050015)
Last change December 14, 200700:00

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: April 29, 1873Roschischtsche (Rozyszcze), Volhynia, Ukraine
15 months
elder sister
6 years
elder sister
6 years
elder brother
4 years
elder brother
Edward Albert Karras
Birth: 1888 48Dombrufka, Russia
Death: June 15, 1972Parksville, British Columbia, Canada
5 years
himself
sister
elder sister
Father’s family with Julianna Nast - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage:
half-sister
half-brother
-4 years
half-brother
half-brother

Birth
There is a William Wonnick servant next door
Shared note
Lived in Moosehorn, Manitoba, Canada Came from Neche, ND in 1911. of Vancouver - 92 yrs old at time of reunion in 1982.